Ubuntu and Fedora

Two months ago I was pondering what Linux distribution to use for my personal machine in the IBM Austin lab. I ended up going with Ubuntu Intrepid – Desktop. At first I had some problems with it albeit all user error like forgetting to disable the power settings so the machine went into suspend mode. After looking back on it, I should have installed the server, not desktop version. Now it seems to be operating just fine.

For my desktop, however, I decided to stick with what I know and went with Fedora 10 for my desktop. After running with Fedora 10 for 1.5 weeks I decided to take the jump on my T60p laptop as well and spent today getting that reinstalled. Overall I’m much happier than I was with the Redhat Enterprise Linux 5 Workstation-based image. Having a recent version of Evolution and other oft-used applications sure is nice, not to mention the little improvements that come with recent Gnome versions.

My desktop is suspending and unsuspending correctly (that should save a few kilowatts of energy over the course of a month) but every time I hibernate the machine it immediately boots back up after successfully writing out the hibernation file. I haven’t had a chance to play with it too much however. I’m hoping I’ll have more luck with the T60p.

Desktop Linux choices

IBM has an standard internal desktop Linux image called the IBM Open Client. This image is based off the Redhat Enterprise Linux 5 Workstation and includes a set of applications to let folks get real work done. Recently they’ve introduced early-adopter programs for an IBM layer on top of Ubuntu and Fedora. The nice thing about using something besides RHEL is that with Ubuntu and Fedora you’re using much more recent kernel and Gnome versions, among other things. Before this Friday I need to select one of the three choices for a reinstallation – I’m mostly undecided which to use.

I possess 3 IBM-provided computers: a T60p laptop and two desktops all of which are running some flavor of the IBM Open Client. One desktop resides in the IBM Austin lab and facilitates me being able to work off-site by providing a place to drive long-running tests and some remote storage. This machine is currently backlevel running RHEL4 and needs to be upgraded to something a bit more current while I’m in town over Thanksgiving. Whatever I do is going to require reinstalling the OS so there’s no real advantage to just upgrading to the latest IBM Open Client image (RHEL4 to RHEL5 requires a reinstall too).

The lab machine operates more as a server than a desktop and being an older model computer it isn’t as though I need a bleeding edge kernel to make the devices work. The most important part of this machine is that it stay on the network and require zero physical interaction — including as few reinstallations as possible. Some might immediately point to a long-term supported Ubuntu release, and I’ve seriously considered that option. The problem is that for my entire Linux career, I’ve been a Redhat/Fedora user and am very familiar with how those distros do things (file layout, configuration tools, package management, etc) — I’m not certain I want to jump to a Debian distro for a remote machine. I’m leaning towards Fedora 10 and while that’s bleeding-edge as far as IBM tools go I think it will be a few years before it comes outdated and I am unable to get package updates for it (which is where I’m at with three Linux servers that I’m responsible for — something I keep putting off addressing).

At some point I’ll be making a similar decision both for my T60p laptop and my dual-head desktop boxes although what I decide to do with the lab machine has little sway on what I’ll end up using for my day-to-day machines. Part of me is still strongly leaning towards Ubuntu if only to become familiar with it and use an LTS release to reinstall the aforementioned three Linux servers.