Tumblr: fracturing communities

One of the biggest problems about Tumblr’s demise is that it will permanently and irreparably fracture the communities that have been built there.

Artists whose content is no longer acceptable on Tumblr (or whose content Tumblr’s bots keep incorrectly identifying as not acceptable, and there are many of them) find themselves with a wide range of other platforms to choose from. And that wide range is a negative, not a positive. Because it doesn’t matter how awesome and welcoming a platform is to a content creator if there isn’t an audience on that platform to consume it.

Sadly, I don’t see that there are any good outcomes. Two weeks isn’t enough time for a critical mass of content creators to rally around a couple of platforms and have their followers follow them there. Instead, content creators will fracture across multiple different platforms, take root, and hope that they aren’t just screaming into the void. Content followers will be forced to create accounts and follow creators across multiple different platforms. And that’s going to be too much work for many people.

It’s generally accepted that the death of Tumblr is inevitable and nigh. It’s sad that they will likely take a large portion of their content creators with them, ironically because there are too many places for the creators to go.