Your tech resume needs help

After slogging through yet another dozen resumes for my two open SDET positions, it’s clear techies need help writing better resumes that convey their expertise and differentiate them from others.

Tweaking a resume

One of my resume tips for folks applying for SDET jobs was to make friends with a technical writer and offer to take them out to lunch in exchange for looking over your resume.1 Having a wordsmith look over your resume with a critical eye is great for tightening up wording, ensuring consistency in tone and verb tenses, and just making sure that the whole thing is coherent to another technically-inclined individual who isn’t you. That advice is just as true now as it was 6 months ago.

But while technical writers are miracle workers when it comes to translating obtuse technical details into prose for the masses, it’s unreasonable to ask one to essentially rewrite your resume from scratch in exchange for lunch. And based on many of the resumes that I’ve been seeing over the past four months, many techie resumes need a rewrite, not just a tweak.

Resume rewrites

In cases where you need more help than just some tweaks, I encourage you to hire a professional resume writer. A resume writer will sit down with you to learn about your technical expertise and accomplishments, then help convey that information on your resume. They can often help strengthen your LinkedIn profile as well, something that I and other hiring managers often look at.

Good resume writers aren’t cheap. It costs anywhere from $500 to $1000 to work with a resume writer, but depending on the state of your resume that could be money very well spent. Given that tech salaries easily run into six digits a year, spending <1% of one year’s salary on an investment in your career should be a no-brainer.

IT Resume Service

Frustrated with the quality of the resumes I’ve been getting as a hiring manager, I did some research to see if there were resume writers specifically for techies. Surely someone was capitalizing on this fertile field of poor tech resumes. And there are!

After reviewing several websites I ran across Jennifer Hay‘s IT Resume Service. I was impressed with her overall approach, list of sample resumes, and articles. After a few emails and a phone conversation with her I feel very comfortable recommending her services.2 We’re even discussing possible future collaborations on articles and other collateral to help tech folks write better resumes.

Contact her to discuss leveling-up your resume.

Even if you don’t use Jennifer, I strongly encourage you to take an honest look at your resume and consider if it could benefit from the expertise of a professional resume writer.

Do it for yourself, but also do it for me and every other hiring manager out there.


1 I also said that technical writers are amazing people and knowing them will enrich your career and your life. That’s still true. I’m good friends with 6 tech writers, or former tech writers, and you simply can’t find better people. Some of them even agree with me on the Oxford comma.

2 I’m not getting any financial compensation from her whatsoever. I just selfishly want to start getting better resumes.

If the FBI wins against Apple, we all lose

The following is a letter I’ve written my US Senators and Representative regarding the FBI’s attempt to force Apple to provide a backdoor into their iOS encryption framework.

Dear $CongressCritter,

I am strongly against the FBI’s attempt to force Apple to provide a backdoor into their iOS encryption framework.

I am not an iPhone user, but as a 15-year veteran of the tech industry, I am intimately familiar with the importance of encryption in today’s technology ecosystem. If the FBI were to force Apple into providing a backdoor into their encryption framework, there is little to ensure that this capability is limited to this one case and absolutely nothing to prevent others from using it once created. To expect that the custom iOS provided to the FBI would never get into the hands of hackers and enemy states is naive and dangerous. Nor is there anything to prevent the FBI or other government security agencies from using this against US citizens in the future.

Forcing Apple to provide a backdoor sets a terrible precedent. It will negatively impact the US technology sector, and thereby the US economy, as individuals and businesses (both within the US and outside of it) stop purchasing US-made equipment knowing that the US government has, or can have, a route into their data.

Privacy and security are inherently at odds with one another and I acknowledge that it is hard to find a balance between the two. But the US government should be directing tech companies to do a better job of protecting citizen’s privacy, not providing backdoors to allow the US government and others to violate that privacy.

Please put pressure on the FBI to withdraw their request from Apple and make it clear that American citizens need strong encryption to protect our privacy and the US economy.

Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

— Benjamin Franklin

Sincerely,
Casey Peel